Embracing the Intellect of the Heart

   In our society, there is an enigmatic taboo that leads many to distrust what they’re instincts tell them to do, where to look, how to be, etc. Sometimes for good reason, but sometimes in excess. From a very young age, all we want is to be accepted, or perhaps to at least be considered “acceptable” in some way if you were not someone who cared what others thought. Either way, we have all struggled to meet a standard at some point in our lives. This is how we’re guided to follow the grain from square one, until we come to a point in our maturity where we completely forget we are following something external at all and are tricked into thinking everything we want and strive for is related to our authentic selves, or true purpose. It is because of this that we sometimes stray away from what we are intuitively pulled towards by the heart, and replace it with our mental constructs and external ideas.

Over time, I’ve been lead to the idea that the heart has an intellect that either no one knows or no one acknowledges. To many, this statement might be very confusing because we’ve made the very definition of the word ‘heart’ to serve as an antonym for the word ‘intellect’. Perhaps this is a symptom of living in separation of the two: “Use your head” or “Follow your heart” we say. We seem to use one or the other depending on the situation. But what if we merged these two concepts together, and used them at the same time? What happens then?

   Personally, I have found that I’ve used my heart to figure out where my mind is supposed to go, upon which my mind takes over and synthesizes what its given. Then, it would be my heart’s duty to feel out the conclusions I’ve drawn, and so on. It goes back and forth in an ebb and flow continuously. In rare instances, I find the two coalesce, like two bodies in space that circle around one another until gravity finally leads them to join in an epic blaze of light and color. They become the same thing essentially, that is what I meant by there being “an intellect to the heart”, which opposes the separation the two concepts.

Two white dwarf stars orbiting each other every 5 minutes.

Photograph courtesy NASA/Tod Strohmayer (GSFC)/Dana Berry (Chandra X-Ray Observatory)

 

The result of this has always been interesting. I’ve come up with my best ideas and produced my best work in these states. But for whatever reason, I see many people not trusting the way they feel, and rely on what they see, or vice versa. I can’t help but notice that we as a society live in a sort of disconnect that keeps us from reaching our full potential, truthfully in many ways apart from what I’ve even discussed so far.

But allow me to diverge for a moment, because I have something I wish to convey.

   I truly believe that certain instances call for you to act on your instinct rather than what is customary. The right thing to do just might be the opposite of what your mind advises. For example, life-changing inventions and problem solving skills generally require an “out of the box” method of approach, as we like to call it. Well, what is this vague “out of the box” thing people speak of? I am no expert but logic would lead me to believe that it involves avoiding the perception that is no longer providing any solutions to the problem, and what most likely lead to the problem in the first place (a rewording of the well known quote by Albert Einstein “We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them”).

   Sometimes we seem to think that something needs a lot of thought and intellectualization, which is likely a product of our education. However, you may inadvertently think yourself into a box that will not lead you anywhere beyond what you can see. A problem may call for a solution that requires a completely different angle of approach. I have found a method that works for me to avoid this trap. It is one simple statement: ‘I know that I don’t know’. It is known as the Socratic Paradox, where one knows that they know nothing. It is possible to have conclusions come out of this approach that are not entirely accurate, but at least it comes from an honest place that lacks any bias that may steer me away from the truth. It’s a good start is all I’m saying. And truth is so subjective that I really can’t ever say anything with complete certainty as we all have our own truth, with threads of validity woven through it all. But when I am listening to someone preach something or share their opinion, I now always ask myself this:  “Where did they begin with the creation of that belief?”

In starting with “I know that I don’t know”, I’m choosing to be careful about contaminating my own understanding with someone or something else’s (which is probably already riddled with mistruths because I’ve never known anyone to approach life in such a clean-slate way).

I can hear everyone’s thoughts right not at this point. They say “But Kerry, what does this even have to do with what you were saying in the beginning with the heart nonsense?”

Calm down, I’m bringing it home.

   Perhaps for some of history’s game changers, the “out of the box” notion is disguised as this moment where the idea of the head and the heart connects, creating the capacity to reach conclusions that could not be made otherwise. Its a sort of reaching out of the five senses, with knowledge previously gained guiding the way, and the willingness connect to something greater than yourself or what you already know.

   If we are to be guided by a true purpose, or wish to live a life of authenticity, we must challenge preconceived notions, understand where it is that they come from, and in doing so, open up to the intellect of the heart.

Screen Shot 2015-02-21 at 9.35.15 PM

Featured image credited to Jacob Jugashvili 

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7 thoughts on “Embracing the Intellect of the Heart

  1. This is a quite profound post!

    I think very few people tend to experience those moments when the heart and mind connect to bring us to a more authentic place and create new, imaginative things, whether those things be of a creative art or scientific breakthrough. I agree that there is an “intellect” to the heart that many don’t realize is even there because we are so bogged down with feeling or not feeling that sometimes the point of connecting and listening is missed.

    Thank you for this heartfelt post.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Alina! I agree with you that many people do not get to experience these moments, and you’re spot on! It took a while for me to express what I wanted to convey with this post. I hope it strikes a chord with people, or at least makes some sense. Even now, I am unsure if I effectively communicated what was in my mind, or if I left something out. I think what I want more than anything is for people to practice following an inner voice, rather than just doing whatever society prompts them to do.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Well, I think that you did a good job here. This is a tough topic to convey and this also gives you an opportunity to address the subject again if you choose in a different way in the future. Sometimes it’s important to tackle this subject from multiple angles; each time reaching more people. Good luck.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Yes, you struck a chord, a loud, profound Beethovian chord! “it is only with the heart that one can see rightly. What is important is invisible to the eye.” the secret of the tamed fox in St. Exupery’s The LIttle Prince is a guiding principal for my life.
    I am thinking you might enjoy the writing of Judith Orloff. She is an intuitive psychiatrist who has let her inuition lead to the point where it has saved at least one life. Her training is medical and therefore quite fact- bound, based on the scientific method, but she has found a way to marry her deep intuitive knowings – her heart instinct – with her training in a way that leads out of the box and up to a higher level of functioning that serves her patients and herself well.
    Thank you for this authentic, awakening post.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Very nice realization and explanation. We must be really dense to believe that Aristotelian logic is the only valid system. You seem to have come close to describing the “zen” mind of no mind. Keep it up.

    Liked by 1 person

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