Misguided Advice: An Experience With Undergraduate Advising

“It takes courage to grow up and become who you really are”

-EE Cummings

I’ve recently read the novel The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt. Although it is a little long for my taste, it’s extremely well written, with several brilliant take away messages. There is only one brief observation Tartt made in her work that I wish to focus on. It is how she describes college from a young Theo Decker, who applies to the University early due to circumstance.

Tartt chose to write about Theo’s perspective of his college professors. All of a sudden, you see that every adult in his life is certain about his interests, and think they know him and what he needs. The Philosophy teacher sees that he is obviously a philosopher who should get involved in their events outside of class. The English professor sees a paper he has written, and believes he must be dedicated to the topic he wrote about, as does all his other professors, who urge him to come to their club meetings and be involved with their pursuits. It reminds me of the expression “If the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail”.

These people take what they know best, and project it onto youth as if it should be their truth as well, the only truth, rather than taking themselves out of their limited perspective and placing it in other positions. With good intentions, its all they know how to do, as that is how they became the people they are in the first place, seeing it as the best method.

   Ive experienced this as well. Everyone thinks they know what you need, and who you are. So much so that they are comfortable with defining you without close inspection, asking broad questions that, at best, link your identity to how you want to make money rather than your character or integrity. It is a fad carried by a world that doesn’t think for themselves, and believes whatever they are told growing up and into adulthood from people in seemingly (and I stress the word seemingly) higher positions than their own. They follow blindly without really asking any questions and assuming their given role indifferently. There are little opportunities, all which mask individuality and demand that you look like everyone else.

At my University, I learned that advisors don’t like it when they ask you what your goals are, and you inform them that there is nothing quite specific in mind, but rather a desire to be involved in something that has a positive impact. That is the answer I gave my undergraduate advisor, that I wasn’t certain exactly where I wanted to end up after this last year of college and beyond that. As long as it felt constructive and that I was doing something meaningful, it didn’t matter to me.

This answer went over her head, and she supplied a response that completely missed the point, blatantly ignoring my expressed desires, with the simple advice to research what employers want, take actions to become exactly what that is (like I couldn’t come up with this obvious plan on my own at this point in my life), and that perhaps I should look into sales (mind you, I have an Environmental Studies major).

I have to admit this pained me quite a bit. I patiently listened to her rant, politely nodding my head in between sentences and quietly giving her a restrained approval at each point made. “Your help is not helpful” I wanted to say. I shook her hand, and left her office feeling alone with my thoughts, sadly without much surprise either, filled with the helplessness of not knowing if there was anyone in this world I could approach who saw things differently. I knew in my core that what she said was so inconsequential to myself and my purpose, so useless that it hurt to think I was expected to adhere to people like her. Certainly I was not the only person who felt this way, (although I don’t know where to find these kindred souls), but was there even any other options to begin with? Did she give this response because there really is no way to make a difference and support oneself simultaneously? Are there no openings for improving the environment despite everything thats wrong with the world?

Many thoughts came to me as I left south campus and drove home. How she was just doing her job, and her advice is a product of the corporate world that we live in, which wasn’t wrong, but not necessarily right either. Where people, as I just explained, only have what they’ve pursued. They’ve followed what they were told to do out of fear of not being able to have the success others defined for them, not driven by integrity, but by what everyone else is doing. It seems that anyone who strays slightly from this line will either be excluded, or take on the allegedly difficult task of creating a place for themselves out of nothing.

“What am I going to do when I know I don’t belong in this world?”, I thought.

I didn’t know, still don’t know a week deep into my last year of college, and probably never will until everything is said in done in the next chapter of my life.

Unlike most of my posts, I didn’t write about this to prove something or produce some kind of conclusion, but rather draw attention to this. The lack of integrity. The scorn for being unconventional. Schools that aren’t focused on preparing youth for our broken world, but rather for the promise of a paycheck. No one asking the true state of things, or challenging what they’re given. Has anyone else noticed?

Thanks University, and thanks society, but I think I’ll be much better off without your ill-advised guidance.

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Sweet Potato Egg Boat: A Review

Here at Metanoia headquarters, we discuss many heavy topics (by “we” I mean a pale girl working in her basement and a scruffy terrier at her feet). It is because of this I decided it was time to take a short break from the intensity, and let loose with something less serious. However, we still like to keep it genuine here, and nothing in my opinion is more authentic than a delectable sweet potato housing a baked egg, covered in creamy avocado sauce.

— Click here for the recipe —

I found this recipe on Pinterest, from a blog called The Healthy Maven.  For an overall rating, I’d give this creation four stars. Its simple, affordable, easy to prepare, and even has an interesting story behind it (someone only had these ingredients in her fridge and figured out that she could just combine them all with the help of her friend).

What you need:

 sweet potatoes, cumin, egg, avocado, lime, garlic, salt and bacon (not shown here):

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If you’re trying to go vegetarian like me, it tastes just as good without the bacon, but I’m sure it adds a heavenly dimension to you meat lovers out there, so have at it.

A few suggestions:

1. Hold off on the lime juice. The directions call for one whole lime, but I think it would make due with just half, as I found the citrus masked the avocado a little too heavily for my liking.

2. I may be the only person who has this issue, but when I cook potatoes in foil, it takes them nearly two hours at 425º to be done. If you also have this problem, try baking the potatoes without the foil, or only slightly covered so they come out nice and fluffy.

3. This tastes great with beer (but what doesn’t?)

Voila!

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(Please excuse my amateur presentation and insufficient cream dribbling)

Well, that’ll be it for a while as far as casual blog posts go. I’ll be on the look out for more ideas like this one for the future. If you tried this, let me know what you thought about it.

From headquarters: we thank you!

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What Is Nothing?

The following excerpt is taken out of The Convoluted Universe by Dolores Cannon. As an investigative hypnotherapist, Cannon made it her life’s purpose to explore the unusual information she encountered regularly during her therapy sessions. This particular quote came from a section called “The Void”.  The woman who sought out her counseling wanted to know more about an experience she had during meditation, where she found herself in a dark, shapeless emptiness. From her account, it was not scary, but still left her with many questions. Amid the explanation she gave while in trance, the subconscious provided this:

“The real reality is the consciousness and is the base of the consciousness, the pure emptiness, the nothingness, from which all consciousness stems… It is the darkness from which the light comes. It is beyond the light … And from the light comes differentiation that we call the somethingness”

Quite a mind bender. Although it resonated as soon as I read it, I had to go over it a few times to let the meaning seep in.

Modern science tells us that everything came from nothing, but this leads me to suspect that we don’t truly understand what “nothing” is. My simple explanation for understanding the “nothing” they speak of has always been this: Nothing is actually something, and this “somethingness” can be anything.

Still, this is only a philosophical understanding. It seems that only spirituality has confidently filled in these blanks with the idea of consciousness, and with that, revealing it’s relationship to light. It is written (or verbalized, I should say) so plainly in this book, and I am always taken aback with its matter-of-fact assertions, considering the depth of whats being said. It is that from consciousness, and from darkness, there is light, and that light provides the medium we understand as ourselves, our lives, and our universe.

So, what is nothing?

According to these sources, nothing can be everything.

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